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MBB at 32 years old as MBA associate... does it make sense?  


edma
Posts: 1
 edma
(@edma)
Working Student
Joined: 4 months ago

Hi, I am currently working as an analyst in a local bank and I am 30. I could apply for a 1y MBA starting in september 2021 and start an intership with MBB in june 2022 and full-time in sept 2022 (if everything goes as planned). This plan is feasible, even at my age because many others did it.

I am worried about my age since I will join a firm where it is likely the engagement manager could be younger than me... but I think that having the MBB brand on the CV is life-changing and still worth it...

 

what do you think?

 

cheers

3 Replies
management.consultant
Posts: 14
(@management-consultant)
Junior Consultant
Joined: 5 months ago

Hey. My honest opinion is if management consulting will make you happy, then do it. Age is never the limit. In consulting, there should be no reason why you would be treated differently. You're judged by your quality of work...not your age. 

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Chet Van D\'Naik
Posts: 35
 Chet Van D\'Naik
Guest
(@Chet Van D\'Naik)
Joined: 4 months ago

Hey Edma,

As the saying goes "Age is just a number" and it truly is. 

In my first job with a Big 4 consulting firm, my manager was a year younger to me, and that is fine, she started before me in the firm. 

What is important is the work you do. If you enjoy the work and if the work gives meaning to your life, then by all means you should pursue it. After a point positions and  titles will not matter on this job, because at the end of the day everyone does the same kind of work.

Hope this helps!

 

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Ryan
Posts: 29
 Ryan
Guest
(@Ryan)
Joined: 5 months ago

Hi Edma,

It's quite challenging but do-able and rewarding with the right attitude. 

A director at BCG, named Andrew Agerback started at BCG at the age of 32, after spending 12 years in the IT industry and that too without an MBA. 

He goes on to mention that the first 2-3 years in Consulting were challenging: 

1. Learning to deal with ambiguity

2. Learning how to be hypothesis driven and utilize the 80/20 rule

3. Learning to use facts and data to support his recommendations

4. Being managed by people sometimes 5 years younger than him but getting to learn a lot 

5. Being asked to do menial tasks such as making formatting changes, booking travel and meetings, etc

6. Figuring out how to make work/life balance manageable. 

What I've learnt from his experience is you can do anything you set your mind to! 

If you want a valuable learning experience as a consultant in one of the top consulting firms you have to have an humility and perseverance. 

Good to hear that you're breaking into consulting and all the very best to you! 

 

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